Pond Plants

A pond without plants can easily look like a puddle,

whilst a well planted pond can look stunning.

Throughout the season (April to September) we stock a huge range of pond & bog plants, to help you achieve a

well balance pond....

Water Lilies  We usually stock over 50 different varieties, from the common Nymphaea alba, to some of the more unusual varieties like arc en ceil and some of the newer American varieties, "Texas Dawn" is a particular favourite with our staff, huge yellow flowers held proud of the water & attractive mottled red & green foliage. Lilies provide shade for the pond, giving the fish somewhere to hide from predators, and reducing algae growth. With lilies ranging from the pigmy varieties to the vigorous, and a range of flower colours, there is a lily variety that is suitable for almost every pond. Marginal Plants As the name implies these are plants for the shallow edges of the pond. They include marsh marigold, irises, water forget-me-not and very many more. Marginal plants help break up the outline of the pond, provide some shade & also provide a refuge for baby fish, tadpoles, etc. We stock a very wide range of marginals in a variety of sizes. Bog Plants These are plants for damp soil around, rather than in the pool. There is however some crossover between these two groups, with some bog plants also capable of being grown as marginals & vice versa. "Oxygenators" Sometimes referred to as "pond weed", "oxygenators" don't actually add much oxygen to the water. What oxygenators are good at is growing quickly, in so doing they remove excess nutrients from the water, and in so doing reduce the growth of algae. As a general guide we suggest 1 bunch of oxygenators for every 2 square foot of surface area. Although some oxygenators (eg hornwort) may be simply weighted down & thrown in, most are best planted. Floating Plants Floating plants help to reduce algae growth, partly by providing shade at the surface, and partly because they grow rapidly and suck excess nutrients out of the water. For years, probably the most popular floating plant was water hyacinth. This is native to South America, but in the wrong situation it can be highly invasive and problematic, clogging waterways, and even power station water inlets. Fortunately there’s no risk of the plant establishing itself in the UK as it is extremely sensitive to frosts & cold weather. None the less, the sale of water hyacinth has now been banned by the E.U. and 2017 will be the last year that that you can find it on sale. As an alternative we recommend water soldier, a native species which is frost hardy, the plants sink to the bottom of the pool in winter, then float back up in spring and summer. Another floating plant that is often available is frogbit which has small, lily like leaves, and being small is better suited than water soldier to small ponds and water features. Duckweed & Azolla are small, floating plants, which can be highly invasive and should not be deliberately introduced into a garden pond, or natural body of water. Their sale in the UK is now banned.

Pond Plants

A pond without plants can easily look like a puddle, whilst a

well planted pond can look stunning.

Throughout the season (April to September) we stock a

huge range of pond & bog plants, to help you achieve a well

balance pond....

Water Lilies  We usually stock over 50 different varieties, from the common Nymphaea alba, to some of the more unusual varieties like arc en ceil and some of the newer American varieties, "Texas Dawn" is a particular favourite with our staff, huge yellow flowers held proud of the water & attractive mottled red & green foliage. Lilies provide shade for the pond, giving the fish somewhere to hide from predators, and reducing algae growth. With lilies ranging from the pigmy varieties to the vigorous, and a range of flower colours, there is a lily variety that is suitable for almost every pond. Marginal Plants As the name implies these are plants for the shallow edges of the pond. They include marsh marigold, irises, water forget-me-not and very many more. Marginal plants help break up the outline of the pond, provide some shade & also provide a refuge for baby fish, tadpoles, etc. We stock a very wide range of marginals in a variety of sizes. Bog Plants These are plants for damp soil around, rather than in the pool. There is however some crossover between these two groups, with some bog plants also capable of being grown as marginals & vice versa. "Oxygenators" Sometimes referred to as "pond weed", "oxygenators" don't actually add much oxygen to the water. What oxygenators are good at is growing quickly, in so doing they remove excess nutrients from the water, and in so doing reduce the growth of algae. As a general guide we suggest 1 bunch of oxygenators for every 2 square foot of surface area. Although some oxygenators (eg hornwort) may be simply weighted down & thrown in, most are best planted. Floating Plants Floating plants help to reduce algae growth, partly by providing shade at the surface, and partly because they grow rapidly and suck excess nutrients out of the water. For years, probably the most popular floating plant was water hyacinth. This is native to South America, but in the wrong situation it can be highly invasive and problematic, clogging waterways, and even power station water inlets. Fortunately there’s no risk of the plant establishing itself in the UK as it is extremely sensitive to frosts & cold weather. None the less, the sale of water hyacinth has now been banned by the E.U. and 2017 will be the last year that that you can find it on sale. As an alternative we recommend water soldier, a native species which is frost hardy, the plants sink to the bottom of the pool in winter, then float back up in spring and summer. Another floating plant that is often available is frogbit which has small, lily like leaves, and being small is better suited than water soldier to small ponds and water features. Duckweed & Azolla are small, floating plants, which can be highly invasive and should not be deliberately introduced into a garden pond, or natural body of water. Their sale in the UK is now banned.

Pond Plants

A pond without plants can easily look like a puddle, whilst a

well planted pond can look stunning.

Throughout the season (April to September) we stock a huge range of pond & bog plants, to help

you achieve a well balance pond....

Water Lilies  We usually stock over 50 different varieties, from the common Nymphaea alba, to some of the more unusual varieties like arc en ceil and some of the newer American varieties, "Texas Dawn" is a particular favourite with our staff, huge yellow flowers held proud of the water & attractive mottled red & green foliage. Lilies provide shade for the pond, giving the fish somewhere to hide from predators, and reducing algae growth. With lilies ranging from the pigmy varieties to the vigorous, and a range of flower colours, there is a lily variety that is suitable for almost every pond. Marginal Plants As the name implies these are plants for the shallow edges of the pond. They include marsh marigold, irises, water forget-me-not and very many more. Marginal plants help break up the outline of the pond, provide some shade & also provide a refuge for baby fish, tadpoles, etc. We stock a very wide range of marginals in a variety of sizes. Bog Plants These are plants for damp soil around, rather than in the pool. There is however some crossover between these two groups, with some bog plants also capable of being grown as marginals & vice versa. "Oxygenators" Sometimes referred to as "pond weed", "oxygenators" don't actually add much oxygen to the water. What oxygenators are good at is growing quickly, in so doing they remove excess nutrients from the water, and in so doing reduce the growth of algae. As a general guide we suggest 1 bunch of oxygenators for every 2 square foot of surface area. Although some oxygenators (eg hornwort) may be simply weighted down & thrown in, most are best planted. Floating Plants Floating plants help to reduce algae growth, partly by providing shade at the surface, and partly because they grow rapidly and suck excess nutrients out of the water. For years, probably the most popular floating plant was water hyacinth. This is native to South America, but in the wrong situation it can be highly invasive and problematic, clogging waterways, and even power station water inlets. Fortunately there’s no risk of the plant establishing itself in the UK as it is extremely sensitive to frosts & cold weather. None the less, the sale of water hyacinth has now been banned by the E.U. and 2017 will be the last year that that you can find it on sale. As an alternative we recommend water soldier, a native species which is frost hardy, the plants sink to the bottom of the pool in winter, then float back up in spring and summer. Another floating plant that is often available is frogbit which has small, lily like leaves, and being small is better suited than water soldier to small ponds and water features. Duckweed & Azolla are small, floating plants, which can be highly invasive and should not be deliberately introduced into a garden pond, or natural body of water. Their sale in the UK is now banned.
Aquarium & Pond, fish, plants & equipment
The Aquatic Habitat
Shurdington Road (A46) Brockworth Gloucester GL3 4PU Telephone 01452 862791
Aquarium & Pond, fish, plants & equipment
The Aquatic Habitat
Shurdington Road (A46) Brockworth Gloucester GL3 4PU Telephone 01452 862791
Shurdington Road (A46) Brockworth Gloucester GL3 4PU Telephone 01452 862791
Aquarium & Pond, fish, plants & equipment
The Aquatic Habitat