Marine Fish

Many people consider marines to be the ultimate in the

aquatic hobby, not least because of their incredible

diversity of shapes & vibrant colours.

When selecting fish for a marine aquarium it is obviously important to ensure that the chosen specimens get on well together & don't eat each other or any invertebrates & corals in the tank. .... Unfortunately marine fish seem to be rather individual in their behaviour, so it is hard to give absolute guidance as to what will or won't be compatible. There are however a few golden rules which, if followed, should help you avoid any major disasters. 1. Before introducing any live stock into your tank, try and work out what you would ultimately like to keep. Seek advice on compatibility from other fishkeepers, and from your retailer. 2. Introduce the smallest specimens first, these will then have a chance to find all the hiding places and establish themselves in the aquarium. When the next fish is introduced although larger, it will be at a disadvantage over the existing inhabitants because it won't know the territory. 3. When adding new fish to an aquarium which contains an aggressive or territorial specimen, add them a few at a time. This way any aggression will be spread around, and hopefully not directed at one individual. 4. Keep a list of the fish you have in your tank and take it with you when you go to buy more, that way you won't forget any when asking advice of the retailer. 5. As a general rule of thumb, marine fish are more likely to be aggressive towards fish of similar shape or colour to themselves. fish that share similar behaviours are also more likely to be aggressive towards one another. Thus a a bottom dwelling fish is more likely to squabble with another bottom dweller than with a surface or mid water swimmer. 6. IF IN DOUBT ASK -It's much easier than having to dismantle all the rock work in order to extract an unsuitable specimen Reef System v's Fish Only A fish only system, as the name suggests, is a tank purely for fish, without any live coral or other invertebrates. The main advantages of such a set up are :- 1. Fish that would eat corals or other invertebrates may be stocked. 2. In the event of a disease outbreak, treatments that are toxic to corals can be used. By contrast a reef system is one which aims to simulate the appearance of a coral reef. In such a tank, the fish often take second place to the corals anemones & other invertebrate life. Fish in such a system are usually small, and obviously selected not to eat or damage the other livestock. Reef systems require better lighting than fish only systems, and other devices such as calcium reactors & Kalkwasser reactors can be of benefit. On the other hand Fish only systems often require better filtration than an equivalent sized reef tank, and if bigger fish are kept then a larger aquarium is also often required.

Marine Fish

Many people consider marines to be the ultimate in the

aquatic hobby, not least because of their incredible diversity

of shapes & vibrant colours.

When selecting fish for a marine aquarium it is obviously important to ensure that the chosen specimens get on well together & don't eat each other or any invertebrates & corals in the tank. .... Unfortunately marine fish seem to be rather individual in their behaviour, so it is hard to give absolute guidance as to what will or won't be compatible. There are however a few golden rules which, if followed, should help you avoid any major disasters. 1. Before introducing any live stock into your tank, try and work out what you would ultimately like to keep. Seek advice on compatibility from other fishkeepers, and from your retailer. 2. Introduce the smallest specimens first, these will then have a chance to find all the hiding places and establish themselves in the aquarium. When the next fish is introduced although larger, it will be at a disadvantage over the existing inhabitants because it won't know the territory. 3. When adding new fish to an aquarium which contains an aggressive or territorial specimen, add them a few at a time. This way any aggression will be spread around, and hopefully not directed at one individual. 4. Keep a list of the fish you have in your tank and take it with you when you go to buy more, that way you won't forget any when asking advice of the retailer. 5. As a general rule of thumb, marine fish are more likely to be aggressive towards fish of similar shape or colour to themselves. fish that share similar behaviours are also more likely to be aggressive towards one another. Thus a a bottom dwelling fish is more likely to squabble with another bottom dweller than with a surface or mid water swimmer. 6. IF IN DOUBT ASK -It's much easier than having to dismantle all the rock work in order to extract an unsuitable specimen Reef System v's Fish Only A fish only system, as the name suggests, is a tank purely for fish, without any live coral or other invertebrates. The main advantages of such a set up are :- 1. Fish that would eat corals or other invertebrates may be stocked. 2. In the event of a disease outbreak, treatments that are toxic to corals can be used. By contrast a reef system is one which aims to simulate the appearance of a coral reef. In such a tank, the fish often take second place to the corals anemones & other invertebrate life. Fish in such a system are usually small, and obviously selected not to eat or damage the other livestock. Reef systems require better lighting than fish only systems, and other devices such as calcium reactors & Kalkwasser reactors can be of benefit. On the other hand Fish only systems often require better filtration than an equivalent sized reef tank, and if bigger fish are kept then a larger aquarium is also often required.

Marine Fish

Many people consider marines to be the ultimate in the

aquatic hobby, not least because of their incredible diversity

of shapes & vibrant colours.

When selecting fish for a marine aquarium it is obviously important to ensure that the chosen specimens get on well together & don't eat each other or any invertebrates & corals in the tank. .... Unfortunately marine fish seem to be rather individual in their behaviour, so it is hard to give absolute guidance as to what will or won't be compatible. There are however a few golden rules which, if followed, should help you avoid any major disasters. 1. Before introducing any live stock into your tank, try and work out what you would ultimately like to keep. Seek advice on compatibility from other fishkeepers, and from your retailer. 2. Introduce the smallest specimens first, these will then have a chance to find all the hiding places and establish themselves in the aquarium. When the next fish is introduced although larger, it will be at a disadvantage over the existing inhabitants because it won't know the territory. 3. When adding new fish to an aquarium which contains an aggressive or territorial specimen, add them a few at a time. This way any aggression will be spread around, and hopefully not directed at one individual. 4. Keep a list of the fish you have in your tank and take it with you when you go to buy more, that way you won't forget any when asking advice of the retailer. 5. As a general rule of thumb, marine fish are more likely to be aggressive towards fish of similar shape or colour to themselves. fish that share similar behaviours are also more likely to be aggressive towards one another. Thus a a bottom dwelling fish is more likely to squabble with another bottom dweller than with a surface or mid water swimmer. 6. IF IN DOUBT ASK -It's much easier than having to dismantle all the rock work in order to extract an unsuitable specimen Reef System v's Fish Only A fish only system, as the name suggests, is a tank purely for fish, without any live coral or other invertebrates. The main advantages of such a set up are :- 1. Fish that would eat corals or other invertebrates may be stocked. 2. In the event of a disease outbreak, treatments that are toxic to corals can be used. By contrast a reef system is one which aims to simulate the appearance of a coral reef. In such a tank, the fish often take second place to the corals anemones & other invertebrate life. Fish in such a system are usually small, and obviously selected not to eat or damage the other livestock. Reef systems require better lighting than fish only systems, and other devices such as calcium reactors & Kalkwasser reactors can be of benefit. On the other hand Fish only systems often require better filtration than an equivalent sized reef tank, and if bigger fish are kept then a larger aquarium is also often required.
Aquarium & Pond, fish, plants & equipment
The Aquatic Habitat
Shurdington Road (A46) Brockworth Gloucester GL3 4PU Telephone 01452 862791
Aquarium & Pond, fish, plants & equipment
The Aquatic Habitat
Shurdington Road (A46) Brockworth Gloucester GL3 4PU Telephone 01452 862791
Shurdington Road (A46) Brockworth Gloucester GL3 4PU Telephone 01452 862791
Aquarium & Pond, fish, plants & equipment
The Aquatic Habitat